Teenagers in Our Midst: Why Are World Class Innovators So Surly?

2017-04-10T21:46:58-06:00By |Innovation Behavior, Uncategorized|

With the passing of Steve Jobs and with it recent reminders of how not only bright and creative, but arrogant and obnoxious he could be, I got to thinking: Why are great innovators at times so insufferable?

The Innovation Killer: “I’ve got mine!”

2017-04-10T21:47:08-06:00By |Innovation Culture, Leading Innovation, Uncategorized|

There’s always a risk, when floating any innovative idea, that it will crash against the rocky shores of personal fiefdoms, entrenched power bases and cronyism, both public and private. The often intense resistance to anything that might require real change often comes down to the same silent refrain: I’ve got mine. Don’t mess with it. It’s a stance that can stop innovation dead in its tracks. There may be no better example of how not to innovate than the current state of American politics.

Adapting to Adapting

2017-04-10T21:47:11-06:00By |Innovation Behavior, Innovation Culture, Leading Innovation, Uncategorized|

Innovative leadership is about being someone who has made this mental shift. It also means giving others the latitude and encouragement they need to do the same. The payoff is an organizational shift away from resistance to change and the tendency to just hunker down, to a much more engaged sense of, “I’m ready world, give me your best shot.”

Getting Engaged

2017-04-10T21:47:13-06:00By |Innovation Behavior, Innovation Culture, Leading Innovation, Uncategorized|

People who are engaged in their work make appropriate adjustments without being told to. They require less supervision and solve problems more quickly. In other words, engaged employees are easier to manage. Without engagement, the only levers available to managers are command and control, reward and punish. That may keep things afloat, but it’s not a path to innovation and growth.

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